Whipped Magnesium Cream

Whipped Magnesium Cream

Those with low magnesium levels are often prescribed tablets. Research is suggesting that we absorb more magnesium transdermally, hence the growing trend of magnesium oil and cream.

As low magnesium levels are typically diagnosed by symptoms, it is hard to get an accurate gauge through blood tests alone. Here are a few symptoms of magnesium deficiency:

  • Depression and anxiety
  • High stress levels
  • Insomnia, difficulty sleeping
  • Restless legs
  • Nausea
  • Low blood pressure
  • Headaches, migraines, cluster headaches
  • Muscles aches and pains
  • Hair loss

I love my magnesium oil.

It is so easy to make, it is super cheap and it has been my saving grace as this ‘Little Pot’ grows up at a super-speedy rate! With a few sprays of magnesium oil on my abdomen every night before bed, I sleep better and I feel more awake when I am awake – rarely do I have a 3pm slump.

I honestly feel a million bucks most of the time (although, I am sure that also has something to do with our lifestyle and the huge amount of water I flush through my body on a daily basis)!

Despite my love for the simple oil spray version, I have been working on the perfect magnesium cream recipe. For some people, it is easier to apply a cream rather than a liquid spray, to specific areas of the body.

According to my research (but do your own of course!), magnesium oil and cream is safe for anyone to use; pregnant women, children, the elderly, etc., and due to the lower percentage of magnesium in this recipe (25% approx. versus 50% in the spray), the cream may be a better option for children (and sensitive adults) as the tingle isn’t quite as strong.

It is best to share a batch of this cream with friends or family if you don’t think you’ll use it within a month or two.

Despite the fact it contains vitamin E, magnesium and essential oils, which all act as preservatives, it does contain water (although I have kept this to the absolute minimum), and water allows for quicker bacteria growth.

If you’re looking for a lush cream, with the benefits of magnesium, then this is the recipe for you!

 

 

Makes: 330 g | 11.6 oz Prep time: < 10 min. (plus setting time)

 

INGREDIENTS

80 g | 2.8 oz magnesium chloride flakes

30 g | 1.1 oz hot water (see recipe notes)

70 g | 2.5 oz coconut oil

50 g | 1.8 oz carrier oil  (fractionated coconut oil and sweet almond oil are popular choices)

40 g | 1.4 oz shea butter

30 g | 1.1 oz beeswax pellets

20 g | 0.7 oz evening primrose oil

10 g | 0.4 oz vitamin E oil

30-40 drops of essential oils

 

My choice of essential oils…

My favourite essential oils in this recipe are wintergreen, peppermint and frankincense, but don’t be limited by my suggestions. Use oils that fit your budget, or those that you already have in your collection. Read here for more information.

 

METHOD
  1. Combine magnesium chloride flakes and hot water in a separate bowl, stir until dissolved and set aside.
  2. Add coconut oil, carrier oil, shea butter and beeswax to a glass bowl and heat until completely melted. (Double boiler method – place bowl on a pot of gently simmering water and stir frequently; Microwave method – heat in short bursts on low, stopping and stirring frequently).
  3. Remove from heat and add remaining ingredients including the magnesium mixture, stirring until well combined. Set aside to cool (you might like to pop your bowl in the fridge).
  4. When the mixture is almost set, scrape away from sides of the bowl. Use a hand or electric beater, and whip until light and fluffy.
  5. Transfer into container of choice.
  6. Place into the fridge or freezer to set (this will reduce the chance of graininess developing over time).

 

THERMAL APPLIANCE METHOD
  1. Combine magnesium chloride flakes and hot water in a separate bowl, stir until dissolved and set aside.
  2. Add coconut oil, carrier oil, shea butter and beeswax to thermal appliance bowl and melt: 4-5 minutes | approx. 70˚C (158˚F) | low speed. Extend time if required, until ingredients have completely melted.
  3. Add remaining ingredients including the magnesium mixture and mix on low speed until well combined. Set aside to cool (you might like to pop your bowl in the fridge).
  4. When the mixture is almost set, scrape away from the sides of the bowl and whip for 30-40 seconds on medium/high speed until white and fluffy.
  5. Transfer into container of choice.
  6. Place into the fridge or freezer to set (this will reduce the chance of graininess developing over time). 

TO USE

Using clean fingers, scoop cream and apply to body. It may be helpful to apply to areas that hold tension, such as shoulders and back, but also to sore joints and muscles.

 

RECIPE NOTES
  • Water should be distilled, purified or pre-boiled and cooled to extend shelf life.
  • I strongly suggest you check out the blog posts under “Recommended Reading“.
Stain Solution

Stain Solution

Fact – clothes get dirty.
Fact – to clean dirty clothes, natural washing powder does the job well.
Fact – sometimes stubborn stains appear that need a bit of extra effort to remove.

It can be tempting to go out and buy a powerful commercial stain remover/bleaching agent.

Please don’t!

I have trialled several different stain removing methods, and while I have a few options for spot treating stains, I think I have hit the jackpot with this recipe for a natural pre-wash stain remover – mainly due to its simplicity and effectiveness, all with minimal effort!

This top got discoloured in the days when I was recipe testing and perfecting my natural deodorant recipes.

This was the result after soaking for 24 hours. Not bad hey?! It also works well on stained tea-towels, and oil spots (and I get a lot of those working with different kinds of butter and balms!)

Before Natural pre wash stain remover | The Inspired Little Pot          After Natural pre wash stain remover | The Inspired Little Pot

Before Natural pre wash stain remover | The Inspired Little Pot          After Natural pre wash stain remover | The Inspired Little Pot

Before Natural pre wash stain remover | The Inspired Little Pot          After Natural pre wash stain remover | The Inspired Little Pot

 

So, If you have whites that are greying, greasy/oily spots or discolouring around collars and armpits, then give this a go. I have trialled this on whites, darks and colours.

Now, while I have never had issues with colour leaching, as usual, I have to remind you to patch test and proceed with caution as all clothing, materials and dyes are unique. 

 

 

Makes: enough for single use Prep time: < 5 min.

 

INGREDIENTS  

½ cup | 130 g | 4.6 oz sodium carbonate (washing soda)

½ cup | 125 ml | 4.2 fl oz hydrogen peroxide (3%)

5 lt | 1.3 gal (approx.) warm/hot water

Fact – clothes get dirty.
Fact – to clean dirty clothes, natural washing powder does the job well.
Fact – sometimes stubborn stains appear that need a bit of extra effort to remove.

It can be tempting to go out and buy a powerful commercial stain remover/bleaching agent.

Please don’t!

I have trialled several different stain removing methods, and while I have a few options for spot treating stains, I think I have hit the jackpot with this recipe for a natural pre-wash stain remover – mainly due to its simplicity and effectiveness, all with minimal effort!

This top got discoloured in the days when I was recipe testing and perfecting my natural deodorant recipes.

This was the result after soaking for 24 hours. Not bad hey?! It also works well on stained tea-towels, and oil spots (and I get a lot of those working with different kinds of butter and balms!)

Before Natural pre wash stain remover | The Inspired Little Pot          After Natural pre wash stain remover | The Inspired Little Pot

Before Natural pre wash stain remover | The Inspired Little Pot          After Natural pre wash stain remover | The Inspired Little Pot

Before Natural pre wash stain remover | The Inspired Little Pot          After Natural pre wash stain remover | The Inspired Little Pot

 

So, If you have whites that are greying, greasy/oily spots or discolouring around collars and armpits, then give this a go. I have trialled this on whites, darks and colours.

Now, while I have never had issues with colour leaching, as usual, I have to remind you to patch test and proceed with caution as all clothing, materials and dyes are unique.

 

 

 

Makes: enough for single use Prep time: < 5 min.

 

INGREDIENTS  

½ cup | 130 g | 4.6 oz sodium carbonate (washing soda)

½ cup | 125 ml | 4.2 fl oz hydrogen peroxide (3%)

5 lt | 1.3 gal (approx.) warm/hot water

 

METHOD

Add all ingredients directly to the laundry sink or a bucket and mix until combined.

 

TO USE

Add stained clothing to solution and use a wooden spoon to push down and agitate clothing. Allow to rest, agitating periodically, for a minimum of 4 hours. Remove from solution and wash clothes as usual. Discard solution.

 

RECIPE NOTES
  • You can find hydrogen peroxide in the beauty aisle of most supermarkets. It is a natural alternative to bleach.
  • You can substitute the hydrogen peroxide for ½ cup | 130 g | 4.6 oz sodium percarbonate.
  • It is a good idea to take a ‘before’ and ‘after’ photos so you can see how well this solution works!
  • Remember to patch test if you’re worried your fabric dye will run.
  • Don’t make this solution in advance. Mix it up just prior to use.
  • I strongly suggest you check out the blog posts under “Recommended Reading“.
Blank Canvas Fizzies

Blank Canvas Fizzies

These fizzy drops are PERFECT for so many applications:

  • In a steam bath or as shower drops for congested airways;
  • In the bath for a fun time for kids, or to help them with relaxation or congestion;
  • As toilet-cleaning drops (they work wonders with a light scrub);
  • In a foot spa;
  • …and the list goes on, and on, and on!!

I do have a little secret to share though, this recipe is exactly the same as my Fizzy Bath Drops.

BUT, this recipe is like a blank canvas.

Store your drops in a container or jar and add your choice of essential oils just prior to use. It’s so versatile and even a makes for a beautiful gift to give, perfectly paired with a bottle of lemon, peppermint or lavender essential oil for someone’s birthday, or maybe with eucalyptus or lemon for an under-the-weather friend.

 

 

 

Makes: 460 g | 16.2 oz (approximately 15 small, 5 large) Prep time: < 5 min. (allow 24 hours to set)

 

INGREDIENTS  

300 g | 10.6 oz sodium bicarbonate (bicarb)

130 g | 4.6 oz citric acid

30 g | 1.1 oz carrier oil (fractionated coconut oil and sweet almond oil are popular choices)

2-3 drops of essential oils (per use)

 

My choice of essential oils…

This varies depending on the intended use. See recipe notes below for ideas.

 

Extra equipment required…

Silicone moulds

 

METHOD
  1. Add sodium bicarbonate and citric acid to a bowl and mix until combined.
  2. Add carrier oil and mix until combined. Mixture should just hold form when squeezed together. If it isn’t holding together, add an extra teaspoon of carrier oil and mix again.
  3. Spoon mixture into moulds and press down firmly until full.
  4. Leave to set for 12-24 hours in a cool and dry place. After this time, turn moulds upside down and gently tap the bottom – fizzies should fall out easily.
  5. Place on a tray or sheet of baking paper and leave to dry for a further 24 hours before storing in container of choice.

 

THERMAL APPLIANCE METHOD
  1. Add sodium bicarbonate and citric acid to thermal appliance bowl and mix for 5-10 seconds on medium speed. Scrape down sides and repeat if required, until ingredients are combined.
  2. Add carrier oil and mix for 5-10 seconds until combined. Mixture should just hold form when squeezed together. If it isn’t holding together, add an extra teaspoon of carrier oil and mix again.
  3. Spoon mixture into moulds and press down firmly until full.
  4. Leave to set for 12-24 hours in a cool and dry place. After this time, turn moulds upside down and gently tap the bottom – fizzies should fall out easily.
  5. Place on a tray or sheet of baking paper and leave to dry for a further 24 hours before storing in container of choice.

 

TO USE

Add essential oils directly to one fizzy (see recipe notes below for ideas for various applications). Drop into water (basin, bath, toilet etc.) and allow to fizz. Store in an airtight container, in a cool, dry place.

 

 

RECIPE NOTES
  • To colour these fizzies, you can use food colouring (natural is obviously my choice – beetroot powder or spirulina are my go-to’s); powder is the best option if you want to avoid the risk of premature fizzing.
  • My favourite essential oils in this recipe are as follows:
    – congested airways (in the shower, facial steam, bath) – lemon, eucalyptus and tea tree.
    – relaxing bath – lavender, frankincense, orange, ylang ylang, vetiver etc.
    – toilet cleaner (drop in the toilet) – clove, tea tree and lemon.
    Remember: don’t be limited by my suggestions. Use oils that fit your budget, or those that you already have in your collection. Read here for more information.
  • Did you know that adding one teaspoon of vitamin C powder to bath water while it is filling, helps to neutralise the chlorine present in unfiltered tap water, and I highly recommend getting some. For more info about the effects of chlorine, head over to the Super Soak – Bath Salts recipe.
  • I strongly suggest you check out the blog posts under “Recommended Reading“.
Simple Beeswax Candles

Simple Beeswax Candles

Did you know that the vast majority of mainstream candles are mostly made from petroleum-based paraffin? Studies show that when burned, these candles release unwanted chemical pollutants into the air including benzene and toluene, which have been shown to cause damage to the brain, lungs and central nervous system.

The synthetic fragrances often used in these candles are chemical minefields (remember companies don’t need to tell you what ingredients make up their fragrances, which may include phthalates – classified as ‘suspected human carcinogens’ and notorious gender-benders) and may contribute to asthma and allergies. And then there are the wicks. Lighting lead core wicks may result in indoor air concentrations of lead higher than the recommended threshold.

So here is a crazy-simple candle recipe for beeswax candles. If you want to burn candles for ambience, this recipe is for you!! While my beeswax pellets omit a very gentle, gorgeous honey aroma, in order to get a more potent scent, I recommend running an essential oil diffuser at the same time.

 

 

Makes: enough for 1 candle Prep time: < 10 min.

 

INGREDIENTS 

20-50g beeswax pellets (depending on the size of your tea light)

1 cotton wick (organic if possible)

1 tea light holder

 

METHOD
  1. Place cotton wick into tea light holder.
  2. Sprinkle beeswax gently into tea light holder until only approximately 1 centimetre of the wick is visible.

 

TO USE

Light the wick and enjoy!

 

RECIPE NOTES
  • The size of the wick will determine the burning time.
  • I do not recommend adding essential oils to the beeswax mainly because you won’t notice the smell and will, therefore, waste your precious oils.
  • Don’t leave candles burning unattended.
  • I strongly suggest you check out the blog posts under “Recommended Reading“.
Carb-Free Deodorant Paste

Carb-Free Deodorant Paste

If you’re finding that sodium bicarbonate (bicarb) is irritating your underarms, please don’t give up on natural deodorants! You could either try my Sensitive Deodorant Paste, Spray Deodorant or this bicarb-free version. I also have a blog with tips on transitioning to natural deodorant. Or, if you really can’t be bothered with DIY today, try a small scoop of coconut oil (the type the solidifies) and a few drops of tea tree essential oil.

 
 

Makes: 270 g | 9.5 oz Prep time: < 10 min.

 

INGREDIENTS 

75 g | 2.6 oz shea butter

75 g | 2.6 oz coconut oil

10g | 0.4 oz beeswax pellets

110g | 3.9 oz arrowroot flour (or cornflour)

40 drops of essential oils

 

My choice of essential oils…

My favourite essential oils in this recipe are lavender, tea tree and patchouli, but don’t be limited by my suggestions. Use oils that fit your budget, or those that you already have in your collection. Read here for more information.

 

METHOD
  1. Add shea butter, coconut oil and beeswax to a glass bowl and heat until completely melted. (Double boiler method – place bowl on a pot of gently simmering water and stir frequently; Microwave method – heat in short bursts on low, stopping and stirring frequently).
  2. Add remaining ingredients and mix until combined.
  3. Transfer into container of choice.
  4. Place into the fridge or freezer to set (this will reduce the chance of graininess developing over time).

 

THERMAL APPLIANCE METHOD
  1. Add shea butter, coconut oil and beeswax to thermal appliance bowl and melt: 4-5 minutes | approx. 70˚C (158˚F) | low speed. Extend time if required, until ingredients have completely melted.
  2. Add remaining ingredients and mix for 5-10 seconds on low/medium speed. Scrape down sides and repeat if required, until ingredients are combined.
  3. Transfer into container of choice.
  4. Place into the fridge or freezer to set (this will reduce the chance of graininess developing over time).

 

TO USE

Scoop a small amount of balm (the size of your fingernail is plenty) and rub gently onto clean armpits.

 

RECIPE NOTES
  • For an extra kick, substitute the arrowroot powder for bentonite clay – a simple straight swap. Sometimes deodorant paste just doesn’t cut the mustard for everyone all of the time and this little hack might just do the trick!
  • I strongly suggest you check out the blog posts under “Recommended Reading“.
Reusable Beeswax Covers

Reusable Beeswax Covers

I just love beeswax wraps. What a great alternative to disposable, land-filling, single-use cling film! I bought one set which lasted me over 12 months (so you really do get value for money) however, I wouldn’t be The Inspired Little Pot if I didn’t try to ‘DIY’ and write up a recipe now, would I? 

So, here it is in all its simple, cost-effective and empowering glory.

It makes the perfect ‘green’ kitchen companion and is also a gorgeous gift to give!

Make sure you read the ENTIRE recipe before starting, as well as the notes. I have done the hard yards (you should see how much beeswax I had to get off my ironing board, iron and floor!!) so if you prepare yourself properly, you should have 100% success the first time!

 

 

Makes: enough for 1 wrap Prep time: < 10 min.

 

INGREDIENTS

A tight-weave fabric of choice

2 tbsp beeswax (approx.)

 

Extra equipment required…

Pinking shears

Baking paper – 2 large pieces (I use these sheets)

Iron

 

METHOD
  1. Measure fabric and cut using pinking shears – this minimises fraying of edges.
  2. Lay down a large sheet of baking paper and place fabric on top. Add beeswax to the centre of the fabric.
  3. Place a second sheet of baking paper on top, and iron (on low setting) with gentle pressure, pushing melted wax towards the outer edges.
  4. Continue until all of the fabric has been saturated with beeswax.
  5. If required, lift baking paper and sprinkle on more beeswax, and continue ironing.
  6. Before removing the baking paper, it is important to make sure the entire piece of fabric is evenly coated with beeswax and still hot. Quickly lift the top piece of baking paper off, then grab two corners of fabric and remove from the bottom sheet of baking paper.
  7. Hold up the coated fabric for 5-10 seconds, or until dry.

 

 TO USE

Wrap gifts and secure with ribbon or twine. For food use, warm wrap between hands and mould over bowls of leftover food, sandwiches or cut fruit. Avoid using with raw meat, fish and chicken products. Wash in warm, soapy water and hang until completely dry, then store flat, rolled or gently folded, in a cool, dry place.

 

 RECIPE NOTES
  • Make sure your baking paper is larger than your fabric square. The amount of beeswax in this recipe should cover fabric approximately 30 x 30 cm | 12″ x 12″ in size.
  • These covers are not watertight or airtight. They are perfect for covering leftovers or pieces of cut fruit and veg.
  • DO NOT cover raw meat.
  • Properly cared for, these wraps will last 6-12 months. When the beeswax looks like it is starting to flake, it is time to make some more, or for an even more sustainable option, repeat the process above and bring them back to life!
  • I strongly suggest you check out the blog posts under “Recommended Reading“.
  • Want to see me make this? Check out my video in The Inspired Collective! Click here to sign up – it’s FREE!

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